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Raising the Visibility of Elmer Brown and the Monumental Cleveland Murals

Raising the Visibility of Elmer Brown and the Monumental Cleveland Murals
Presentation: Wendy Partridge, Paintings Conservator, ICA-Art Conservation

Wednesday, February 26, 2014
10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.
Cleveland State University
Student Center Ball Room, 3rd floor
Reinstallation of mural in the Student Center Ballroom

In observance of African American History month, Wendy Partridge will speak on the history and conservation treatment of two monumental murals by African American artist Elmer Brown (1909-1971). The murals were commissioned in 1940 for one of the first housing projects in the United States under the auspices of the WPA's Federal Arts Project. When their original building was demolished, these important murals were saved in a highly creative collaboration between the Housing Authority and Cleveland State University. They are now on public view in a highly prominent location in the Ballroom of the Student Center at CSU.

The talk will focus on Elmer Brown and the history of the murals in the context of the federal arts program in Cleveland, where a number of African American artists far exceeded the national average. It will also address the complicated deinstallation, conservation treatment, and reinstallation of the murals by the ICA.


The presentation will be given in the Student Center Ballroom (3rd floor) at Cleveland State University, 2121 Euclid Avenue, on Wednesday, February 26th at 10:00 a.m. This program is free and open to the public and is provided as part of ICA's Education and Outreach initiative, which is funded in part by Cuyahoga Arts & Culture and the Ohio Arts Council. It is hosted by Cleveland State University's Michael Schwartz Library, History Department, and the Black Studies Program.


About the presenter

Wendy Partidge at workWendy Partidge at work in the lab.

Wendy Partridge has a graduate degree in Paintings Conservation with an M.A. in art history from the Conservation Center, Institute of Fine Arts, NYU. Prior to working for the ICA, she had internships and fellowships at the National Gallery, Washington, the J. Paul Getty Museum, and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. She is a professional associate of the American Institute for Conservation (AIC) and served for two years as chair of the AIC Paintings Specialty Group. She enjoys the community engagement and teaching opportunities afforded by working at a non-profit regional conservation lab. She is also the coordinator of the letterpress studio at Zygote Press in Cleveland.

An exhibit, The History of Elmer Brown Murals, will be on display in the Michael Schwartz Library from February 21 through March 31.

For more information, call 216-875-9734 or email b.i.loomis@csuohio.edu



Permanent link to this topic. Posted 2014-02-14 12:54:08. Reply to Barbara_Loomis. Categories: Library News.

Read-In Day to Celebrate Writing by and about Women, March 20th--Invitation and Call for Reader

National Women's History Month logo

>>THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELED.<<
In celebration of Women's History Month, the Michael Schwartz Library, in conjunction with the English Department, the Cleveland State University Poetry Center, and the College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences, is hosting a Read-In Day from 2:30 to 3:30 on Wednesday, March 20th.

The campus community is invited to hear fellow faculty, staff, and students read aloud both fiction and non-fiction prose and poetry by and about women that is significant to them. This event is free and open to the campus community.

CSU students, in particular, are encouraged to not only attend the event for their enjoyment, but also for the opportunity to make the most of Women's History Month by learning about and sharing literary works by and about women. There is also the possibility that said works will foster among the attendees further interest and education about women's literature and history.

If you would like to participate as a reader contact Professor Barbara Walker, English, at 216-687-2563 to discuss your selection and to schedule a time (limited to 5 minutes). Sign up today!

Read-In Day is a national initiative that is sponsored by the National Council of Teachers of English that focuses on literacy by encouraging reading.

Permanent link to this topic. Posted 2013-02-25 14:45:41. Reply to Lauren_Felder. Categories: Library News.

Read-In Day to Celebrate Writing by and about Women, March 24th--Invitation and Call for Reader

Women's History Month logo
In celebration of Women's History Month, the Library, in conjunction with the English Department and the Poetry Center, is hosting a Read-In Day in the Library from noon to 1:00 on Thursday, March 24. The campus community is invited to hear fellow faculty, staff, and students read aloud both fiction and non-fiction prose and poetry by and about women that is significant to them. This event is free and open to the campus community.

CSU students, in particular, are encouraged to not only attend the event for their enjoyment, but also for the opportunity to make the most of Women's History Month by learning about and sharing literary works by and about women. There is also the possibility that said works will foster among the attendees further interest and education about women's literature and history.

If you would like to participate as a reader, contact Professor Barbara Walker, English, at 216-687-2563 or b.s.walker@csuohio.edu to discuss your selection and to schedule a time (limited to 5 minutes). Time slots are filling up quickly--sign up today!

Read-In Day is a national initiative that is sponsored by the National Council of Teachers of English that focuses on literacy by encouraging reading.

--by Sergio Wilkins, Communication Major, CSU

Permanent link to this topic. Posted 2011-03-01 16:21:55. Reply to Barbara_Loomis.

Read-In Day to Celebrate Writing By and About Women, March 25

To celebrate writing by and about women, the Library, in conjunction with the English Department and the Poetry Center, is hosting a Read-In Day in the Library from noon to 1:00 on Thursday, March 25th. The campus community is invited to hear fellow faculty, staff, and students read aloud both fiction and non-fiction prose and poetry that is significant to them. This event is free and open to the campus community.

Be a Reader
If you would like to participate as a reader contact Professor Barbara Walker, English, at 216-687-2563 to discuss your selection and to schedule a time (limited to 5 minutes). Time slots are filling up quickly-sign up today!

Read-In Day is a national initiative that is sponsored by the National Council of Teachers of English that focuses on literacy by encouraging reading.

Permanent link to this topic. Posted 2010-02-26 12:49:28. Reply to Barbara_Loomis. Categories: Library News.

Read-In Day to Celebrate Writing By and About Women: Sign up to read your favorite passage

National Women's History Month logo
Tuesday, March 25, 2014
Noon - 1:00 pm
Read-In Day to Celebrate Writing By and About Women
Location: Michael Schwartz Library, 1st floor east

In celebration of Women's History Month, the Michael Schwartz Library, in conjunction with the English Department, the Common Reading Program, and the College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences, is hosting a Read-In Day from Noon to 1:00 pm on Tuesday, March 25th.

The campus community is invited to hear fellow faculty, staff, and students read aloud both fiction and non-fiction prose and poetry by and about women that is significant to them. This event is free and open to the campus community.

CSU students, in particular First Year Students enrolled in ASC 101 Introduction to University Life, are encouraged to not only attend the event for their enjoyment, but also for the opportunity to make the most of Women's History Month by learning about and sharing literary works by and about women. There is also the possibility that said works will foster among the attendees further interest and education about women's literature and history.

If you would like to participate as a reader contact Professor Barbara Walker, Department of English, at 216-687-2563 to discuss your selection and to schedule a time (limited to 5 minutes). Sign up today!


First Year Students please register here

Read-In Day is a national initiative that is sponsored by the National Council of Teachers of English that focuses on literacy by encouraging reading.

Permanent link to this topic. Posted 2014-02-06 12:51:07. Reply to Barbara_Loomis. Categories: Library News.

Read-In Day: Call for Readers and an Invitation

National Women's History Month logo

In celebration of  Women's History Month, the Michael Schwartz Library, in conjunction with the English Department, the Cleveland State University Poetry Center, and the College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences, is hosting a Read-In Day on the 1st floor of the Library, from noon to 1:00 on Thursday, March 22nd.

The campus community is invited to hear fellow faculty, staff, and students read aloud both fiction and non-fiction prose and poetry by and about women that is significant to them. This event is free and open to the campus community.

CSU students, in particular, are encouraged to not only attend the event for their enjoyment, but also for the opportunity to make the most of Women's History Month by learning about and sharing literary works by and about women. There is also the possibility that said works will foster among the attendees further interest and education about women's literature and history.

If you would like to participate as a reader contact Professor Barbara Walker, English, at 216-687-2563 to discuss your selection and to schedule a time (limited to 5 minutes). Sign up today!

Read-In Day is a national initiative that is sponsored by the National Council of Teachers of English that focuses on literacy by encouraging reading.

Permanent link to this topic. Posted 2012-03-09 08:40:37. Reply to Lauren_Felder. Categories: Library News.

Read-In Day: Celebrating Women's History Month

To celebrate writing by and about women, the Library, in conjunction with the English Department, the Poetry Center, and the Women's Studies Program, is hosting a Read-In Day in the Library from noon to 1:00 on Thursday March 26th. The campus community is invited to hear fellow faculty, staff, and students read aloud both fiction and non-fiction prose and poetry that is significant to them.
Read-In Day is a national initiative that is sponsored by the National Council of Teachers of English that focuses on literacy by encouraging reading.
This event is open to all faculty, staff, and students.

Permanent link to this topic. Posted 2009-03-12 15:51:49. Reply to Barbara_Loomis. Categories: Library News.

Reduce your library fines with Elf!

Elf offers library customers a way to keep track of their borrowed items from multiple libraries in one place by email or browser. Receive email courtesy notices when items are due, overdue or ready for pick up. Text messaging for holds is also available.

Features
  • email/RSS alerts: pre-overdue, overdue and holds
  • track your library card(s) or your family's library cards
  • selectable delivery date for reminders
  • text message hold alerts
  • real-time web access
  • one page summary

Benefits
  • reduce overdues
  • reduce the 'oops, I forgot' factor
  • organize and plan your library trip and activities
  • take the worry out of borrowing
  • encourage reading and learning


To get started, complete the simple sign up form and register your library card number(s) at: www.libraryelf.com

Permanent link to this topic. Posted 2009-01-16 16:06:40. Reply to Tracy_Kemp. Categories: Library News.

Refworks & Copyright Workshops for Faculty

The Center for Teaching Excellence (CTE), in partnership with the Michael Schwartz Library, offers a variety of workshops and discussions intended to help faculty at all levels of experience improve their instructional practices.

Register for any of these sessions by contacting the CTE: cte@csuohio.edu or call 216-687-5502 (email is preferred). Lunch is provided if the registration is received 2 days prior to any given workshop.

Image of lap-top plugged into the world
  • November 1, 2012
    21st Century Copyright Issues: Intro to Copyright
    Noon
    MC 103
  • November 6, 2012
    Refworks: Getting Citations into the Refworks Account
    4PM
    RT 502
  • November 8, 2012
    21st Century Copyright Issues: Copyright & Multimedia
    Noon
    MC 103
  • November 13, 2012
    Refworks: Using Write-N-Cite to Format Paper & Bibliography
    4PM
    RT 502
  • November 15, 2012
    21st Century Copyright Issues: Copyright & Your Online Course
    Noon
    MC 103
  • February 12, 2013
    Impact Factors & Citation Analysis
    Noon
    MC 103
  • February 26, 2013
    Refworks: Getting Citations into the Refworks Account
    4PM
    RT 502
  • February 28, 2013
    Who Owns Intellectual Property--Author Rights, Creative commons, and Open Access Publishing
    Noon
    MC 103
  • March 5, 2013
    Refworks: Using Write-N-Cite to Format Paper & Bibliography
    4PM
    RT 502

Permanent link to this topic. Posted 2012-11-01 12:29:29. Reply to Tracy_Kemp. Categories: Library News.

RefWorks Will Be Unavailable Sat., Jan. 2nd

Due to server upgrades, RefWorks will be unavailable on Sat., Jan. 2 at 4 am for up to 6 hours. We apologize for the disruption of service.

Permanent link to this topic. Posted 2009-12-30 07:45:20. Reply to Lauren_Felder. Categories: Library News.

RefWorks Workshop: Find Out How to Save Time When Doing Research and Writing Papers

This poor girl needs RefWorks STAT!

Learn how you can save time doing your research and writing your papers by attending the Library's RefWorks Workshop on Tuesday April 12, 2011 at 4 p.m. RefWorks is a web-based research management and writing software package that enables you to:

  • Organize your research
  • Include citations while you write your paper
  • Build a bibliography in a variety of formats
  • Import references from many data sources
  • Create bibliographies in different document formats (Word, RTF, HTML, etc.)

This workshop will be held in RT 502 in the Michael Schwartz Library in Rhodes Tower and is open to faculty, staff, and students.

Light refreshments will be provided and there will be an opportunity to win door prizes. To reserve a seat, please RSVP to Barbara Florjancic at (216) 875-9734 or b.florjancic@csuohio.edu.

Permanent link to this topic. Posted 2011-04-07 14:52:37. Reply to Lauren_Felder.

Remembering 10 Cent Beer at Cleveland Municipal Stadium, June 4, 1974

Injured pitcher led off field
A security guard escorts Indians pitcher Tom Hilgendorf from the field after he was hit on the head with a folding chair.

by Vern Morrison, Digital Production Assistant, Michael Schwartz Library

Established in 1901, the Cleveland Indians are a charter member of the American League. From the early days at League Park through the present day at Progressive Field, the Indians have taken part in nearly 9,000 major league games in that span. Cleveland has played host to the greatest players in the history of baseball, including Babe Ruth, Ted Williams, Mickey Mantle, and our own Bob Feller. Clevelanders have watched World Series games here, have seen perfect games pitched here, have seen fielders record unassisted triple plays here.

Of all of those thousands of home games, one of the most famous -- and certainly the one which was the most infamous -- took place in Cleveland Municipal Stadium between the Indians and the Texas Rangers on Tuesday, June 4, 1974. That is a day which will forever live in infamy as Ten Cent Beer Night. The game is not remembered for the play on the field, but rather for the behavior and actions of a few hundred of the 25,000 fans in attendance, many of whom took full advantage of a special promotion enabling them to purchase beer for the low price of ten cents a cup.

Umpire leads a bleeding fan off the field
Umpire Joe Brinkman leads a bleeding fan off the field during the fan riot in the infamous "Ten Cent Beer Night."

With no real restrictions on how many beers one person could buy at that price, many fans began to consume as much beer as they could hold. And perhaps bored with the game itself (the Rangers took an early lead and never trailed), many of these intoxicated fans began to misbehave. Some of them ran out onto the field, not always fully dressed. Others lit firecrackers in the stands, or threw projectiles, including bottles and full cups of beer, onto the field.

Despite repeated pleas for civility and order by team officials over the public address system, the mayhem continued. In the ninth inning, with the score tied at 5-5 and the Indians at bat, one fan tried to steal the cap from the head of Rangers outfielder Jeff Burroughs. Angry and fearful for the safety of his players, Rangers manager Billy Martin led his team, some of whom were brandishing baseball bats, onto the field to defend themselves. In a show of solidarity, some Indians players came out to join them.

But it was no use. Hundreds of fans stormed the field, and as the cliché goes, a melee ensued. Some fans took drunken pokes at Rangers players, at Indians players, and at one another. Indians pitcher Tom Hilgendorf was hit by a folding chair. When umpire Nestor Chylak was himself injured, he'd decided he'd seen enough, and declared the game forfeited to the Rangers.

For a time, the Indians continued to hold promotions involving beer sold at a discount, but they placed and enforced restrictions on how much beer one person could buy, and became less tolerant of rowdy and intoxicated fans.

Like it or not, the memory of Ten Cent Beer Night, like the flaming Cuyahoga River, has become and may forever be part of our city's legacy.

See photos of Ten Cent Beer Night in Cleveland Memory.


Permanent link to this topic. Posted 2014-05-22 10:40:52. Reply to Lauren_Felder. Categories: Cleveland Memory.

Remembering George Dallas, the "Thanksgiving Santa Claus"

Mr. and Mrs. George Dallas
Mr. & Mrs. George Dallas handing out
Thanksgiving lunch boxes, 1928.

Beginning in 1924 and well through the Great Depression years, successful Cleveland restaurateur, George Dallas, provided a free Thanksgiving meal to thousands of unfortunate Clevelanders who were facing hard times.

Dubbed the "Samaritan of West 3rd" and the "Thanksgiving Santa Claus" by the Plain Dealer, Dallas, his wife, Alma, and his daughter, Marie, would arrive at their restaurant at 1363 W. 3rd Street and would begin preparing for the presentation of the thousands of boxes containing sandwiches, dessert, fruit and coffee. In 1929, Dallas' "grocery list" for all of the meal boxes he made that year included 200 lbs. of bologna, 210 lbs. of special sausage, 350 lbs. of goose liver, 112 fresh hams, 96 turkeys, 16 barrels of apples, 22 barrels of oranges, 1,200 loaves of bread, and 2,000 cakes. The number of people he served grew each year until in 1932, Dallas fed 10,000 people in Public Hall.

Over the years, the Plain Dealer has offered a couple of different accounts about what initially inspired George Dallas to provide his annual free Thanksgiving meal. In a Nov. 24, 1929 article, Dallas, himself states that "the idea came to me in a dream once,"(p. 12A) while an article from November 22, 1930 issue says:

Dallas came from America as an immigrant from Greece when he was 12 years old and penniless and hungry, was turned down when he asked someone for food. He vowed then he would never refuse a hungry man a dinner if it was in his power to give him one. (p. 15, col. 4)

Finally, George Dallas' obituary from the December 25 1952 P.D. gives the following account:

Mr. Dallas came to Cleveland from Athens, Greece, as a boy of 9. He was supposed to meet an uncle here, but the latter had returned to Greece. So the boy found himself homeless and hungry on Thanksgiving Day. That was the inspiration for feeding unfortunates on that holiday. (p. 27, col. 1)

No matter the reason, George Dallas summed it up well when he said, "People say 'Why do you do it, George?' but I say 'I work hard, I make money -- but you can't take your money out of this world with you. This is what I like to do with it.'"

See more photos of the "Thanksgiving Santa Claus"


Permanent link to this topic. Posted 2012-11-08 10:59:16. Reply to Lauren_Felder. Categories: Cleveland Memory.

Remembering the JFK Assasination November 22, 1963 - PART 1

The teletypes in the Cleveland Press UPI room came to life with the first reports at 1:34 p.m.:

"DALLAS -- Three shots were fired at President Kennedy's motorcade today in downtown Dallas."

"No casualties were reported."

"The incident occurred ... just east of an underpass leading toward the Trade Mart where the President was to ma--

Then, at 1:39 p.m., the newsfeed took a dire turn:

"FLASH"

"KENNEDY SERIOUSLY WOUNDED."

"Perhaps fatally by bullets."

John F. Kennedy in Cleveland, 1960
Sen. John F. Kennedy addressing a crowd at a
1960 campaign rally at Euclid Beach Park.

President John F. Kennedy was only 46 and, at the time, the youngest president to ever be elected when he was struck down by two bullets while riding in a motorcade on his way to a speaking engagement in Dallas, Texas on November 22, 1963. The youngest president to be elected was also the youngest president to die.

Fifty years have passed since the assassination and many of us who were around then can still recall where they were and what they were doing when they heard the tragic news and the feeling of shock, disbelief, and sadness that followed.

An article* on page one of the Cleveland Press from November 23rd, the day after the assassination, captures the local reaction to the tragedy:

A tremendous, all-engulfing wave of grief and shock, swift and numbing, swept downtown Cleveland this afternoon with the news that President Kennedy had been assassinated.

Up and down Euclid Ave. the word swept like wildfire. Strangers grasped each other by the arm ... "Did you hear? ... The President was shot. ... Terrible. ... Terrible!"

Pedestrians called the news to people on buses, who passed to word to each other ... "What kind of a world is this? ...Who could do such a thing? ... What about Jackie? ... Is he alive? ... Is he dead?"

News of the assassination jammed telephone systems causing, as the Press reported, the worst tie-up of phone facilities in memory. Children were sent home from school, events were cancelled and downtown stores dressed their windows for mourning with black crepe and photos of the deceased president. CONTINUED IN PART 2.

*"Shock, Grief Grip Big Crowds Here." The Cleveland Press 23 Nov. 1963: A1 and A6. Print.


Permanent link to this topic. Posted 2013-11-20 10:29:50. Reply to Lauren_Felder. Categories: Cleveland Memory.

Remembering the JFK Assasination November 22, 1963 - PART 2

Press employee faints
Cleveland Press employee, Mrs. Catherine Mills,
faints the day of John F. Kennedy's death.

CONTINUED FROM PART 1.

Photos of the Cleveland Press newsroom taken that day show a frantic staff rushing to get the story to press, all the while dealing with the shock of the tragic event.

In the Press office, people clustered around the chattering teletype machines so deep it was hard for newsmen to work.

Visitors in the office joined the reporters, crying out their stunned disbelief, asked each other: "Is he dead or alive? How could it happen? What kind of country is this anyway?"

One classified ad department employee, Mrs. Catherine Mills, fainted in the City Room when she heard the flash. She was administered oxygen and quickly revived.*

The home delivery of the Cleveland Press was as much as two hours late that evening as more than 125,000 copies of the Home Edition of the Cleveland Press, without news about the assassination, were recalled and delivery trucks were reloaded with the latest edition quite literally ripped from the presses.

Bishop Nelson M. Burroughs of the Episcopal Diocese of Ohio expressed the following:

"In John Kennedy, we have a man whose complete devotion to his country was strikingly evident. We honor him for all he has done for us. Thoughts and prayers and support of all Americans will surround the new President in the task he assumes."

In the end, the dreadful events of that day left Greater Clevelanders, along with the rest of nation, to grieve the loss of a "devoted leader" and to ponder an uncertain future with a new one as Head of State.

Read more Press articles about Cleveland's reaction to the assassination.

*"Shock, Grief Grip Big Crowds Here." The Cleveland Press 23 Nov. 1963: A1 and A6. Print.


Permanent link to this topic. Posted 2013-11-20 10:47:11. Reply to Lauren_Felder. Categories: Cleveland Memory.

Resetting your Library PIN

If you forget your PIN to access your account or the Library's databases, you can now reset it yourself anytime day or night. When logging into your account click on the link that says "Forgot your PIN?" Enter your name and CSU ID number. You will receive an e-mail to the e-mail account we have in your Library record. Follow the instructions in the e-mail to reset your PIN. For more information, call the User Services Desk at (216) 687-2479.

Permanent link to this topic. Posted 2008-10-30 09:34:10. Reply to Tracy_Kemp. Categories: Library News.

Return your books to the new Library book drop

Book dropHave books to return and can't make it before we close? That's ok, return them to our book drop located outside of the lobby of Rhodes Tower. Books can be returned to the book drop 24 hours a day/seven days a week.

Permanent link to this topic. Posted 2006-10-31 11:13:18. Reply to Tracy_Kemp. Categories: Library News.

Rhodes Tower Power Outage to Disrupt Library Services Sat. April 22, 9:30 PM

There will be an electrical power outage of Rhodes Tower on Saturday April 22, 2006. The power outage will start at 9:30 p.m. Saturday night and it will last 8 hours.

Please note that during this time, the Library Website and SCHOLAR will be unavailable as will access to OhioLINK research databases and borrowing from the OhioLINK central catalog.

Questions about the power outage should be directed to Chris Wilson, Director of Utilities, 216-687-5009.

Permanent link to this topic. Posted 2006-04-19 09:33:51. Reply to Lauren_Felder. Categories: Library News.

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